ASELLA, ETHIOPIA – DÜSSELDORF
AMR NETWORK

Slide Partnership Photos 21 Slide 0K7A0650 Slide Assela Day Two photos Jpgs 145 Slide Lab photos 3

Slide Partnership Photos 21 Slide 0K7A0650 Slide Assela Day Two photos Jpgs 145 Slide Lab photos 3

PARTNERSHIPS

PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN:

Düsseldorf University Hospital, Clinic of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases / Germany

&

Arsi University, Asella Teaching and Referral Hospital / Ethiopia

Tackling antimicrobial resistance in Africa – a global problem of unknown dimensions

Bacteria and other germs adapt when they are exposed to anti-microbial treatments such as antibiotics. This results in resistance against the substances used and medications lose their effect. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) can render it impossible to treat common infections and leads to substantially increased healthcare costs, prolonged treatment, disability and death. AMR is a global problem and thus needs to be tackled globally. It exists in every country.

MORE ABOUT ETHIOPIA

  • Ethiopia is the oldest independent and the second-most populous country in Africa with 114.7 million inhabitants. It is the most populous landlocked country in the world. Apart from a five-year occupation by Mussolini’s Italy, Ethiopia has never been colonised.
  • In 2018, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed launched a campaign of political liberalisation at home and sought to end disputes with Ethiopia’s neighbours, in particular Eritrea. Parliament elected Sahle-Work Zewde as Ethiopia’s first woman president in October 2018.
  • Life expectancy at birth in Ethiopia is 63 (m) / 67 (f) years.
  • The probability of dying before the age of five is 55.2 for 1,000 live births.

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The main causes of this development are the overuse of antimicrobial medicine – especially in agriculture and animal farming – and unnecessary prescriptions for patients. Inappropriate use, wrong dosage, and lack of knowledge by medical doctors and patients alike aggravate the problem. A contributing factor is non-targeted antibiotic therapy in absence of microbiological results. The extent of AMR in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is largely unknown, mainly because relevant data are missing.

This is also the situation in Ethiopia, which is facing the continuous development of antibiotic resistance against available antibiotics. And, as in many LMIC, the extent of the problem is unknown for lack of data.

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Because of limited microbiological infrastructure in most parts of the country, the resistant bacteria have not been identified. Authorities also do not know which medicine is still effective. Only this information can allow medical professionals to choose the right antibiotic and the government to develop national treatment guidelines.

The Ethiopian government has recognised the need for improving this situation.

Based on this national as well as existing international commitment, the two partnering universities have decided to tackle this important public health problem and join the global efforts to stop further development of antimicrobial resistance.

Joint efforts include the establishment of a data collection system, a  surveillance system, the training of laboratory personnel to identify bacteria causing clinically relevant infections and possible resistance against the available antibiotics, and training of medical doctors to handle antibiotic treatment responsibly and based on the information available. The partnership is also supporting the Ethiopian government in the development of standard treatment guidelines based on the data collected.

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eHEALTH

Our eHealth Contribution

One important problem identified is inadequate communication between the medical doctors caring for patients and the laboratories performing the required analyses. The requests for testing are paper-based and frequently get lost with the respective specimens on their way to the laboratories, or are severely delayed. The same applies to test results: These often reach the doctor late or never, making it impossible to base clinical decisions on them.

Therefore, the partnership decided to use an innovative approach and develop together with IT specialists an app-based system for communication between the laboratory and medical doctors. This will ensure timely delivery of the request and of the test result as well as the collection of valid data for subsequent analyses and the development of local evidence-based guidelines.

All tools developed consist of free and open-source software which has been adapted in teamwork with neighbouring African regions. Six HKP-supported partnerships collaborate closely because they use the same approach. This collaboration calls itself the COMBAT AMR network.

The COMBAT AMR network enables comparing and sharing as well as joint discussions on data, exchange of experiences and discussions on possible solutions. The network develops regional recommendations on AMR, and it creates substantial synergies.

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Düsseldorf University Hospital, Clinic of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases / Germany

The Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases is one of Germany’s leading institutions for the study of infectious diseases and tropical medicine. The newly built Liver and Infectious Diseases Centre hosts specialised ambulances and wards, covering the whole spectrum of infectious and tropical diseases including vaccination and travel advisory services, hepatitis and HIV therapy, diagnostics and therapy of tropical diseases as well as treatment of highly contagious and pathogenic diseases in the special isolation ward.

Contact:

PD Dr. med. Torsten Feldt
Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
Oberarzt der Klinik für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Infektiologie
Kommiss. Direktor: Prof. Dr. J. G. Bode
Moorenstraße 5
40225 Düsseldorf 
torsten.feldt@med.uni-duesseldorf.de

Asella Logos2

The Hirsch Institute for Tropical Medicine in Asella / Ethiopia

Düsseldorf’s Clinic of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases founded the Hirsch Institute for Tropical Medicine in Asella, Ethiopia, in 2013 with the objective of knowledge transfer and creating a research platform for studies on infectious diseases and tropical medicine in close partnership with the specialists of Arsi University. Joint research and teaching activities include projects on such locally relevant topics as Mother and Child Health, hospital hygiene, infection prevention, patient safety and, increasingly, AMR.

Arsi University Asella Teaching and Referral Hospital / Ethiopia

The Asella Teaching and Referral Hospital was founded in 1964 and is now part of the newly founded Arsi University and its College of Health Sciences. As a tertiary hospital, it serves as a referral hospital for the Arsi Zone, providing healthcare for its more than 3.5 million inhabitants. Specialised departments include the Emergency Room, Internal Medicine, Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics & Fistula Unit Surgery, and Ophthalmology. Recently, an intensive care unit has been established.

Contact:

Professor Häussinger
Hirsch Institute of Tropical Medicine
Institute Coordinator & Deputy Director
P.O. Box 04
Asella
+251(0)983030837
+251(0)904748338

MORE INFORMATION

ABOUT

Düsseldorf University Hospital, Clinic of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases / Germany

The Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases is one of Germany’s leading institutions for the study of infectious diseases and tropical medicine. The newly built Liver and Infectious Diseases Centre hosts specialised ambulances and wards, covering the whole spectrum of infectious and tropical diseases including vaccination and travel advisory services, hepatitis and HIV therapy, diagnostics and therapy of tropical diseases as well as treatment of highly contagious and pathogenic diseases in the special isolation ward.

Contact:

PD Dr. med. Torsten Feldt
Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
Oberarzt der Klinik für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Infektiologie
Kommiss. Direktor: Prof. Dr. J. G. Bode
Moorenstraße 5
40225 Düsseldorf 
torsten.feldt@med.uni-duesseldorf.de

Logo HHU 1

The Hirsch Institute for Tropical Medicine in Asella / Ethiopia

Düsseldorf’s Clinic of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases founded the Hirsch Institute for Tropical Medicine in Asella, Ethiopia, in 2013 with the objective of knowledge transfer and creating a research platform for studies on infectious diseases and tropical medicine in close partnership with the specialists of Arsi University. Joint research and teaching activities include projects on such locally relevant topics as Mother and Child Health, hospital hygiene, infection prevention, patient safety and, increasingly, AMR.

Arsi University Asella Teaching and Referral Hospital / Ethiopia

The Asella Teaching and Referral Hospital was founded in 1964 and is now part of the newly founded Arsi University and its College of Health Sciences. As a tertiary hospital, it serves as a referral hospital for the Arsi Zone, providing healthcare for its more than 3.5 million inhabitants. Specialised departments include the Emergency Room, Internal Medicine, Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics & Fistula Unit Surgery, and Ophthalmology. Recently, an intensive care unit has been established.

Contact:

Professor Häussinger
Hirsch Institute of Tropical Medicine
Institute Coordinator & Deputy Director
P.O. Box 04
Asella
+251(0)983030837
+251(0)904748338

Asella Logos2
AMR Network
AMR NETWORK 

Kumasi, Ghana – Hamburg

Jimma, Ethiopia – Munich

Butare, Rwanda – Berlin

Nairobi, KenYa – Frankfurt

Kampala, Uganda – Leipzig

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